~JOYRIDE K9 *REMOTE* K9NW EDUCATION~

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    • #7838
      Kimberly Buchanan
      Keymaster

      So one of the things I’ve noticed is that people *forget* that there are potentially other dogs – often MANY other dogs who are playing the game of K9 Nose Work in their area. Dogs who do different activities and sports. So I like to talk to my beginning students about the protocols when working with odor and what can happen if you don’t follow them. Or – what if someone else doesn’t?

      What if someone had put odor on the Dog Walk a few weeks ago and your dog notices it in the middle of their Agility run?

      What if someone put odor out near their set up or in the parking lot of an Obedience trial and your dog notices it as they are in the ring with you?

      What if someone put hides out in the park where you walk your dogs but you don’t know about it and you correct your dog for sniffing. Or you ignore your dog’s signals indicating odor is in the area?

      What if someone put a hide on your vehicle in the Grocery Store parking lot and you drove off with the hide? At what point will you realize there is mystery odor on your car and what damage will be done to your teamwork by the time it is discovered?

      These are just a few of the scenarios of things that have happened to people when others are not considering how it could potentially affect others. There was (maybe still is) someone who coordinates “practices” in their local parks and gives coordinates so others can run those hides for the next week. How is that helpful for those who don’t know? How is that helpful when you’re not *exactly* sure where the hides are and can’t support your dog? How is that being a considerate trainer of K9NW?

      Just some things to think about. Accidents happen, hides can be lost and those things are part of life. But to purposely put hides somewhere that lingering odor will be an issue or in a situation that will mess up other dogs and handlers is really very inconsiderate. So if you know people are doing this please explain to them why they shouldn’t for your sake and theirs! ๐Ÿ™‚

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #7847
      Susanne Howarth
      Participant

      This is an interesting — and perhaps eye-opening — topic for me, because one of the times and places where I try to do a bit of nose work practice with my girls is at the park where we have our agility classes, immediately following our agility class. It gets us away from home to do some practice, and I always account for (i.e., put away) all of my hides after we’re done. Also, while we place hides on the park’s picnic tables and fencing and things like that, we do NOT place it on any of the agility equipment, so no particular risk of distracting agility runs.

      Also, at least for now, I seem to be the only club member who is at the park on Thursdays and who does nose work, so not currently likely to create issues for other folks who are there for agility or obedience classes and whose dogs “stumble” across our hides. Although I leave my girls crated in the same location as we are for our agility class, I set the hides a ways away — both away from our crating area and the class ring and other dogs. And pretty much all of the other club members and/or instructors who are there attending/teaching classes have seen us working and know what we’re doing.

      So, is what we’re doing OK to your way of thinking? Or are there things we should do differently? Or not do at all? It’s been working well for us, from a training perspective, but I don’t want to be messing anyone else up!

    • #7851
      Donna Ewing
      Participant

      Since my dogs participate in multiple disciplines, I always try and make sure I don’t mix and match. As much as I hate to admit it, though, I have placed a hide or two that got ‘lost’ – one was in a lamp post and it fell in and I was unable to retrieve it. I still remember that one!

    • #7865
      Kimberly Buchanan
      Keymaster

      Sue, I think what you’re doing is ok – at least until someone else who does NW says “hey, we’re practicing agility here!” ๐Ÿ™‚

      What I’m really hoping for is a realization that things can always have an impact on other teams so use due diligence by making sure you’re not on top of the other activity, you don’t leave hides out, pick them up, etc. Dogs can smell odor from LONG distances and your girls likely know which game you’re playing and it doesn’t affect them. (Mine do, as well.) But just be aware, that’s all. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #7866
      Kimberly Buchanan
      Keymaster

      Hides DO get lost by the best of us! It is less expected in a public park, tho’, so if it’s lost to the park gods, just be aware that someone else might detect it at some point. I teach at a place that had the ORIGINAL classes. Same room. Same lost hides from YEARS ago. Plus we have multiple K9NW instructors and occasionally we’ll find a hide someone missed. My class dogs often notice lingering odor. It happens. Just be AWARE. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #7876
      Susanne Howarth
      Participant

      Sounds good. And yes, that lingering odor lingers a LONG time! And while I try to account for all of my hides, that doesn’t always happen. One time, I got all the way home and realized that I had been distracted and left ALL of our hides out at the park. By the time I drove back several hours later, a couple of them had gone completely missing: I knew where they had been, and they weren’t there any more. ๐Ÿ™

    • #7903
      Kathryn Dobyns
      Participant

      I have occasionally left a hide behind by mistake but mostly I am very conscientious about picking everything up when we are done. Recently, my students placed a whole bunch of hides on a couple of vehicles for Hunter & I to do blind – I forgot to emphasize to my students to pay attention and remember where the hides were. Anyway, one got left behind and my regular training partner found it in the parking lot the following week while setting out new hides!

    • #7906
      Kimberly Buchanan
      Keymaster

      Ah, yes, the “helpful students!” I’ve had hides lost due to students helping to pack up an area, too. Make sure the odor is picked up before they help or hides will end up in stacks of chairs or accidentally go home inside that container they brought! ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #7913
      Holly Hoover
      Participant

      Some druggies watched us set some hides. They think we are training drug dogs. They stole a tin full of birch off of a semi we had planted.

    • #7923
      Kimberly Buchanan
      Keymaster

      Ok, that’s a new one to me!

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

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