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NW301: Stefanie & Prim (Bluetick Coonhound/Greyhound mix, AK)

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    • #6260
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Prim is a 4-year old female hound mix who loves All-Things-Scent. A rescue, she has had issues with confidence and tends to be quite subtle with her alerts when stressed or distracted. Because she prefers to get as close as she can to hides, I believe this class will be perfect for us to communicate with even more synchronicity. A Harry Award winner, Prim has earned her NW1 (May 2014) and NW2 (September 2015) titles. We’re currently training toward the NW3 and tracking in our spare time.

    • #6261

      Yeah! So glad to see you and Prim back again! 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6304
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Are You Sure, Pt. A

      Background information: We have put our house on the market and our better boxes are now at a premium as we are getting ready to move. However, we were able to re-use some smaller ones that are flimsier. The three hides are in a triangulated pattern and include the two “Roomba” boxes as well as the one duct tape USPS box in the right hand corner of the screen. Prim’s alert includes a look my way and that is how I usually determine her pawing versus a true alert. During trials, she has never damaged or destroyed a container. However, for some reason at home when we practice [as this video shows], she is most exuberant.

      This is evident as she locates Hide #1.

      Between 15-30 seconds, she is cheating, pouncing and trying to rattle the boxes. Note that she even false alerts on a box around 24 seconds. I ignore her and she then slowly gets back to work. A bit later, I believe she is about to destroy the #2 container and she has difficulty locating me behind her to give me the look. I probably reward that one too early, even stating “Alert.” I need to stop doing that on the known hides.

      After hide #3 is located, Prim does a perimeter sweep and then exits the search area and goes into the garden for about 30 seconds. There are many distractions in our backyard this evening. Neighboring dogs are barking and children are yelling. The video ends too early, but shortly thereafter, Prim reenters and alerts again on the Roomba box.

    • #6314

      Hi Stefanie – I know you’re working thru some things with Prim right now. I might otherwise consider just taking her out of the search area once she started pouncing on boxes. You would need to decide if that is too punitive for her right now.

      Here are the other things I see;

      After watching Prim “guess” and pounce on boxes, I would recommend NOT WAITING for any kind of communication from her when she gets to an actual hide. Interesting you felt you rewarded too early. If you see her sniffing, get in there and pay. The communication is NOT the most important thing here, it’s Prim getting focused on finding the odor. (The communication will come, truly!) I’m just afraid the delayed reward – not acknowledging she is correct, waiting for a look plus taking too long to get the reward out of the baggie – will have a negative impact. It could create even more frustration (and more box destruction) and it also interrupts her searching for too long. You want to reward fast and get back to work IMO.

      Great that you caught yourself saying “Alert.” 😉

      What I noticed in addition to Prim working a bit more of the perimeter after she found all the hides is that she started noticing the barking dogs and other distractions more.

      What are your thoughts, knowing Prim’s overall behavior with the imminent move?

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6358
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Hi Kim,

      Just wanted to check in to let you to know that we did have Pt. 2 of this exercise complete (we taped it concurrently with Pt. 1), but Prim is as naughty and I am as slow as in the first part. We’ll try again later today.

      Overall, Prim seems very frustrated with our neighborhood and the nonstop noises. We have new neighbors on either side of us who both are incredibly permissive pet owners, and Prim has been agitated by them as well as the imminent move.

      Anyway, we’re re-grouping and hoping to post something less embarrassing sometime today 🙂

    • #6361
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Are You Sure, Prim B: Here is our attempt for today. The neighborhood is quiet although it is unseasonably warm for Alaska. We normally do hides on the larger main part of our “L”-shaped deck, but although it is only 68 degrees, the main deck’s thermometer says 103 degrees in the full sun. For this reason, we have opted to set up this search on the smaller part of the deck around the corner. It is partly shaded, although it will have 2 levels to search. The temperature is around 70 degrees or so with little breeze.

      Hides 1 and 2 are in the “Roomba” boxes, anise and birch respectively. The third hide is clove and is in the box with the duct tape. The distractors are the only round box (roasted and lightly salted macadamia nuts); the smaller brown square (Zukes); and the postage box next to the first hide (stale goldfish crackers).

      My goal for me was to reward as quickly as possible when she hit each box; Prim’s goal was to be working and not destroying. Overall, I think we showed some improvement. However, the goldfish distractor in particular was potent–at 29 seconds or so, she is standing on this box, but not alerting.

      One other issue we’ve had with the unseasonably warm weather are the flying insects. Prim loves to chase bugs, often leaping and eating them. Notice how she almost gets hide #3 when a hornet enters her airspace and I pull her off as she almost devours it. Normally, if it was something without a stinger, I would have let it go, but not in this case.

      Another critique: I probably shouldn’t tell Prim to “leave it!” when she starts to exhibit her batting behavior. I was glad she got back to work, though.

      At the video’s end, she perimeters and then heads out off the search area. I call it at this point.

    • #6376

      Ok, a couple of things I saw;

      First off, you have way more leash than you need for this search. I would go to a 6-8′ length.

      Part of the exercise involved paying your dog each time she went to source. You praised her off instead of paying. Knowing there are distractors nearby you risk her becoming more interested in those than odor (since it’s not paying anymore). Just something to think about and why I added that part into the exercise.

      Also, you are marking each find with a “yes” the first time 2/3 of the time. I think this will become confusing to Prim when you do a blind search and don’t know where the hides are. Relying on her to stay at a hide w/o a marker could be a challenge later on.

      Overall, I see improvement from Part A of the exercise. Using this part of your decking is an interesting adaptation of the exercise. I think I would have spread out a little bit more, even into the gravel (or is that her potty area?) to give more space between boxes. I think the reason she missed the last hide could have been because they were very close together.

      Nice that there were no barking dogs this time! 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6383
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      You are correct: this smaller search has a potty area off of it (gravel), hence the reason we didn’t place boxes there. Also, due to the poor lighting of this shady space, I don’t believe it is evident that I’m paying Prim. Her favorite lately is pancakes, and I’m literally feeding her mini ones. I don’t think the video adequately shows this.

      New for me (unfortunately): For some reason (and this is the 3rd class we’ve taken online with you), I did mark and say “Yes.” I don’t recall ever doing that before. I’m thinking since I’m not saying “alert,” I’m nervously chattering, thus potentially confusing my hound even more. Thanks for the feedback.

    • #6394

      LOL! “Nervously chattering” – sorry, that cracks me up! So many people just talk talk talk to their dogs when they search and they’re completely unaware. 🙂

      No worries! I think you have marked with a “yes” in the past. Sometimes that becomes so ingrained it is habit and I do recall you saying it before. But you didn’t call “alert” this time. 🙂

      Is there an industrial park with a lot of concrete sidewalks that you could use after hours? Or a park that isn’t very populated? I’m just thinking it might be good to get Prim in a new but more neutral location? Or would that be too much for her right now?

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6395
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      We filmed this next series on the same day and on the deck again. For future exercises, we can take Prim to a more neutral location with concrete–great suggestion. She seems to be getting her groove back 🙂

      Prim High Container: This is on our large deck and off leash. There are 15 boxes. The hides have cooked just a tad over and hour are in the two large blue luggage pieces as well as a box adjacent to the door (almost a threshold). Temperature: it was cooler yesterday (65 degrees outside; 80 degrees in the sun on this deck). Wind was minimal.

      After getting the initial hide near the doorway, Prim false alerts twice. I move her along. She finally settles in and gets to work. She alerts on hide #2 and is rewarded. As she begins to move toward hide #3, I trip on a bucket handle, but do reward as I believed at the time she was in odor (and I’ve been slow in the past).

      After all hides are found, Prim goes back to both Hides #2 and #1, wagging her nubbins. I call it as she seems to me to be indicating that she’s found them all. I want to end positively, thus my urge to call it and verbally praise.

    • #6405

      I like the variety of containers you selected and the spacing looks good for a small area. 🙂

      Prim’s threshold find was nice!

      I am wondering about the two boxes she false alerted on. When did you tape those up, before or after you set odor? There could be some drift and odor pooling on those, as well, both at the end, but looking at all possibilities?

      I think you’re smart to pay fast and the verbal/physical praise seems to help her gain confidence. Also, calling the search when she went back to the threshold hide once again was a good choice IMO.

      Good use of body pressure to get Prim to investigate certain areas and you generally stay out of her way nicely. There was just one spot (1:09-1:12) where you were in her space but overall a good job.

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6427
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Thanks for your feedback. Regarding the two boxes Prim false alerted on, they were taped up after the odor cooked for an hour.

      My thoughts on this:

      *We used duct tape because with our current situation, we ran out of strapping (clear packing) tape. This may be an issue because when we first began NW (and before we knew about the extra strong putty), we used a strip of rolled duct tape to adhere the hide tins. I’m wondering if Prim is associating this duct tape smell with a hide. [Because she is a sight hound as well, she early on would attempt to cut corners and not use her nose. We again noticed this when we first began as she would visually see the tin and would alert without sniffing. To break her of this, we did set out never used tins and after awhile, she learned that she needed to check rather than bat that paw.] Long story short: it could be the tape. Rest assured, I’ve gone to the store and gotten more strapping tape!

      *I was using one of Prim’s favorites as a reward: Alaskan sourdough pancakes (bite-sized and home-made). They don’t have any syrup on them, but they are a very high interest treat. I’ve found in the past when she is very much wanting a high interest treat, she will false alert in hopes of getting paid without actually working, and I’ve consistently ignored her and moved through the search area in order to get her to re-engage.

      Do either of these scenarios sound like they may be the case?

      Yes, I absolutely was in her way (1:09-1:12) and I was aware of it especially since my videographer (husband, Brendan) was madly motioning to me from the sidelines to move 🙂

    • #6429

      Ah… Really good information!

      I am thinking you are going to need to proof Prim off of duct tape! One of the first NW3 trials, I remember a couple of dogs indicating on blue painter’s tape. No, it wasn’t contaminated but it was used to tape up some paper on windows to block views and some dogs found the smell interesting, leading the handlers to call alert. Really an eye-opener to see that the dogs might respond to something we aren’t even considering! (And the reason we now tape paper on the OUTSIDE of windows!)

      Also, good observation about the reward. We often talk about increasing the value of the reward, etc. There are dogs who become overly excited about the rewards and will either not focus on the search or do what Prim does and false just to get the reward. For those dogs, we might feed them a bit before a search so they’re not as ravenous or just lower the value of the reward to a more appropriate level for that dog.

      Great info! 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6430
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      And I’m glad you asked the question about the boxes as I really needed to consider why she was false alerting–this isn’t something she consistently does. It took me back to our early days of training and remembering what we did and when. Who would’ve thought about the duct tape? Seeing it on the video, though, I believe it makes perfect sense and this was a great learning moment for us. We will proof her and consider a light feeding before such a high interest treat.

      Stay tuned for “Prim Low Container.” Will post soon.

    • #6431
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Prim Low Container: This is on our smaller deck and off leash on the same day as the above search. There are 15 boxes, some on the gravel (before potty area due to spacing). The hides have cooked over an hour and are in the red bag (screen left), green bag (screen right lower corner), and grey backpack (screen right upper corner). I appreciate that Prim is not only speedy, but seems to be checking the low seam corners. Notice the beautiful head turn on hide #1 around 7 seconds 🙂

    • #6432

      Very nice! Good persistence and yet you were still able to move her on. You can see her little nubbin tail wag a bit faster when she gets to odor. 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6433
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Prim High and Low Containers: This is on the large deck and off leash. There are 20 containers. The hides have cooked over 1.5 hours and are in the large blue luggage pieces as well as the red and green bags. Prim seems pretty efficient at searching the entire area, both high and low, and committing to the odors. After she finds all four, she again goes back to the ones that have odors and seems rather emphatic that she’s found them all and wants to be paid. Yikes: I said “Yes” again. 🙁 Then I praise.

      One quick question: I noticed that after she finds hide #1, I re-cue and as she begins to pounce, I point forward. Is this something to avoid doing? Paradoxically, I did and did not mean to lead her… 🙂

    • #6452

      After having success in her last search, Prim did a great job of checking the threshold container here! 🙂

      She looks focused and determined with odor, which is great!

      In the way you’re using “yes” it’s more of a praise than a marker so don’t beat yourself up about it. 😉

      It’s best to let the dog choose which way to move after finding a hide but it’s hard to know where to stand or move as a handler in a small, crowded space so you just do the best you can!

      Are you feeling better about Prim’s progress lately?

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6458
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Hi Kim,

      Yes, I am very pleased with Prim’s progress lately. She does seem to have her work ethic back and is demonstrating focus and determination. Besides this, she is really wanting to do nose work: when my husband is setting the hides, she is beside herself with anticipation and even vocalizing prior (and she is a silent hound–we had her for over two years and only heard her bark once in that time). 🙂

    • #6460

      Yeah! 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6551
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      For Merging Vehicles, I opted to use a long line. I find that I am too controlling with a shorter leash in a bigger space and I want Prim to be able to move. The trick will be staying out of her way! All three of these (A-C) were taped today, Memorial Day, but at different nearby locations using all three odors. It is 70 degrees, partly sunny, and very blustery. Note: we only own two vehicles, so in order to do the exercises requiring three, we were creative 🙂 Also, since these were in high traffic public areas on a holiday weekend, the odor did not cook long. We pretty much arrived, set up the search area, taped/worked, and left to the next location.

      Merging Vehicles #A: This is at a school near a soccer field. The hides are triangulated on each of the vehicles as well as the metal gate. Prim easily finds hide #1 on the blue Vue around 8 seconds. I believed she would move to the next vehicle and surprisingly to me, she went to the gate (19 seconds or so) for hide #2. The wind is swirling and she does leave the search area, but returns. I suspect the odor was over there, but I also know that rock is a frequent potty area for many neighborhood dogs. Around 48 seconds, you can tell by my feet placement that I want us as a team to move right; however, Prim is working and clearly wants to go around the blue Vue again, working diligently. Around 1:05, I ask her to go to the other vehicle and she does. Notice how I’m moving toward the front wheel of the black Vue and she moves correctly toward the middle of the vehicle, thus locating the hide 🙂

      LOL: Windy conditions and my hair is literally standing straight up as the video ends.

    • #6559

      Prim looks very relaxed and engaged with the search! So glad to see her working well! 🙂

      You also came up with a creative way to do this search, so kudos. 🙂

      You mention the pee rock. This is a really good video to show what is likely multi-tasking. We humans like to put things into categories. It helps us make sense of this strange scenting game that we can only observe because we just don’t have the same olfactory senses as our dogs do. I don’t think it’s quite so black and white with scenting. Based on Prim’s body language, it does seem to me that she was working odor. She might have detected the pee smell (and other interesting smells) on the rock but she was probably driven there by following the scent of our odors. Dogs multi-task all the time but it’s not always so clear, as in “Pee vs. Birch.”

      Prim makes a good decision, with your encouragement, to continue working the odors on the vehicles and does a nice job of sourcing all 3 hides in just over a minute! Good work! 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6562
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Merging Vehicles #B: This is filmed on the other side of the school in the parking lot. You can hear the wind howling as well as see the cottonwood flying. Prim is very excited to work and has a definite, enthusiastic bounce in her step as we begin. She does a great job of locating hide #1 (7 seconds). She begins to go around that same vehicle and you can see her head turn as she moves to the diagonal of the second vehicle, thus locating hide #2 (16 seconds). She revisits and then begins to move around the black Vue; I’m certain the way she’s working that she will get the third hide located in the middle (41 seconds or so). However, she clearly false alerts on the back wheel well instead (46 seconds or so). I’m thrilled she isn’t frustrated and she does keep working back and forth, high and low, determined to locate that hide located on the middle seam. She does so. I’m thinking the odor from hides #1 and #2 are blowing strongly across from the other side, thus giving her a great challenge.

    • #6570

      Sorry for the delay, Stefanie, I thought I wrote this up already….

      Great decision making by Prim between find #1 & #2 and you did a nice job of stepping back to allow her to come back to the second hide. On the third hide it does seem she was catching the first thru the wheel and a bit of confusion as to why she wasn’t being paid. I think part of the issue is that the 3rd hide appears to be a bit under the vehicle so it was also drifting and merging with the other two odors. I wonder if that hide had been above the lip of the edge if she would have had an easier time sorting it out? Or possibly the next time she sees the problem she’ll recognize it without any trouble at all. 🙂

      Good work!

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6576
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      It was no delay at all, Kim. We’ve been busy with an inspection and an appraisal as our house sold! Prim will be thrilled to be in her new space in less than a month 🙂

      Quick question: on the directions for Merging Lanes #B, you give a hint, “paying out the line.” What does that mean? I don’t know if I did that above as it is a term I’m not familiar.

    • #6578

      “Paying out the line” is a term we use to indicate giving more leash to let the dog move in front of you. Down the narrow space between vehicles is a good place to use this so you don’t crowd your dog. It does mean the dog needs to want to work away from you but all too often people are rushing to keep up with their dog and the body pressure moves the dog away from the odor they were working. You do a nice job of stepping back and opening up the search for Prim to work the second hide and you were not on top of her at any point. 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6589
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Thanks for the clarification on “paying out the line.” Good to know I wasn’t in her way as this is something I have really needed to be cognizant of as a handler.

      Merging Lanes #C This is filmed on the third side of the same school. We begin near a hockey storage bin, but this isn’t in play. Instead, we are using both vehicles and the large dumpster. Prim moves forward and uses a different metal gate (than exercise #A) to zero in on the hide located on a seam of the dumpster. She then works on the back side of the blue Vue and up and around to locate hide #2 (which she missed on the first approach). She returns to the dumpster and seems to be crittering on an icky spot (wet from trash or a creature) and I opt to pull her off there—a rather heavy handed turn I admit– and ask her to move to the other vehicle. She then successful zeroes in on the last hide.

    • #6601

      The wind sounds pretty strong. I wonder if Prim was drawn to the furthest hide first? By the angle of the trash bin, I have to think that the odor is blowing thru the adjacent vehicle and probably converging quite a bit.

      I don’t think you were too firm with Prim when you moved her on from whatever it was on the dumpster. But I do think she was working odor when she went there initially. 🙂

      Good work! I’m so pleased to see Prim working enthusiastically.

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6623
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      “What Level Is This?” For parts A-C, we used a neighborhood church parking lot. It was approximately 50 degrees (colder than it has been), partly cloudy, light wind, and an occasional mist of rain. All three odors are used.

      Part A (Low): This consistently has been an area Prim needs to work on–for some reason (perhaps a gap in our early training), she consistently blows by low hides in nose work, especially if there are a series of them in a row. For this exercise, we opted to set the 3 hides in a zigzag yet linear formation in a landscaped area in the parking lot. This area has river rocks, trees, and shrubs, along with the blacktop of the parking lot.

      This was our first attempt, and she was right on, finding all in less than a minute.

    • #6625

      Prim worked this search so nicely! 🙂

      It looks like you took a moment at the start to get Prim focused so once she began her search she was right on task! I think it helped that prim could work the curb so there was a tiny bit of elevation at the beginning but she continued from hide to hide at that level. Nice job!

      We – as handlers – think ground hides are easy so we don’t take the time to train them like we do other challenges. We work elevation and inaccessible and converging odors but we need to train for ground hides, too. We’ll cover some of this in the “Back to basics” course but I would suggest working lots of ground hides with different kinds of surfaces from rocks to sidewalks to big grass fields. 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6627
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Yes, thanks for the suggestion to work lots of ground hides and on variable surfaces. This is making me re-think nose work and the need for “textures.” [In tracking, I’m always thinking about surfaces as Prim truly is a nose-to-footprint tracker and she struggles on long stretches of asphalt (with no foliage around). Dirt, grass, snow, ice, rock all seem to hold the odor better, but in different ways depending on the conditions.]

    • #6628
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Part B (Medium): This location is the back side of the church parking lot. There is a utility building with a brick wall partially enclosing a trash receptacle. The 3 hides are on the receptacle (near back) along with the far left brick wall and the far right bollard.

      As we begin, Prim is trotting enthusiastically and ready to work. [“Holy-moly” I tell her as she gallops into the search area :)]. I initially believe she is going to get the middle hide on the receptacle first, but she veers toward the left and finds the hide on the far left brick wall (second 10 or so). Next, she does return to the middle, but then breaks right to the bollard hide (25 sec). Interestingly enough, she chooses to search the entire back perimeter of this structure, making good time and following the scent cone back to the far left brick wall. I’m thinking there is convergence at this point, and because it is a tight fit near the receptacle, I try to get out of her way and feed her some leash line to give her the necessary room to trace the scent cone to source.

    • #6631

      Wow! Look at her enthusiasm! What a difference from the first search of this course to this one!

      Prim is looking very good! Interesting that she chose to go around the building working the last hide. I’m thinking maybe she’s just being thorough? Could be chasing the odor from hide #2? Not sure. But she’s picked up a good degree of speed and still maintained her efficiency so this is nice to see. 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6636
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Part C (High): Prim, being an agile dog, usually doesn’t have issues with high hides, so we decided to up the ante by not only placing these hides in a triangular fashion, but also have the middle one on a corner of the brick exterior of the building. This provided a necessary level of difficulty for where she is right now. I wondered initially by the wind picking up on this corner and the very light rain along with a barking dog if she’d get frustrated, and at one point, you can tell by the video that she stops and ponders (2:45), but this is a great example of her needing to work through the scent cones in order to trace the odor back to source. Note: this video is 3 minutes long, a tad bit longer than her usual 1.5 minutes or so.

      To start, Prim begins with a bounce in her step—something that I’m thrilled to see as she really wants to work. Yay! She diligently traces the cone down and up to find hide #1 on metal door (17 secs).

      Next, we are basically working a variety of surfaces: bark, brick, grass, concrete, and asphalt as Prim narrows in on the next hides. I believe she’s in position to get the hide on the metal pole (1:25), but she is distracted by a barking dog and we’re back to working the two converging cones. Finally, after going back and forth along that brick corner and her even pointing her nose upward, she works a window (2:28) and is able to zero in from there (2:31).

      By 2:45 as mentioned above, Prim stop and appears to want help. I do elect to place one arm behind my back and then take a step forward. I don’t know the time, but I’m thinking we’re getting close to the 3 minutes or so.

      As you can see in this video, Prim does struggle, but what I’m very happy about is that she has the endurance and determination to keep working.

    • #6646

      Stefanie, you are such a wonderfully supportive handler for Prim! She really responds to your encouragement! So I’m going to give you some ideas of what I’m seeing and how you can become an even better partner for her. 🙂

      First, I think you have way more leash than you need. Go with maybe 4-6 feet less. Having said that you do need to USE the leash more to get more space from Prim. IMO you are crowding her quite a bit. If you watch your video, you are too close on several occasions. Perfect distance for a vehicle but too close for working Exterior, especially with elevated hides that will travel out from source. The first hide I think you’re a bit close but it doesn’t seem to impact Prim and she works that one out easily.

      Now watch yourself with the hide on the corner. You look to be consciously giving Prim space but I think you need even more. Maybe you were following the line of the pavers so as not to trip? What’s even more important is that you stop and give some ever-so-slight leash direction to Prim at (:36) so she doesn’t go so far down the wall. IMO she needs to go further. She needs to check the column and adjacent corner so SHE can decide there is no odor down there OR if she detects odor SHE can decide that source is back the other way. By applying the leash pressure here (and later on) you don’t allow her the freedom to make that decision.

      So then Prim checks the ground. Is she working odor? Is she crittering? Is she investigating the great smells on the ground? Probably all of the above. I’m happy she ranges out and cruises the grass next. 🙂

      You can see a head turn at (:54) towards the hide on the pole. But then she turns back the other way, still nose to ground. She changes direction again at (:59). Look at the body pressure you’re putting on her to continue in her current direction. Kudos to Prim for ignoring you! 😉 And here you give her some good distance as she investigates the sidewalk. She heads towards the parking lot and you restrict her leash which is reasonable, I think.

      Prim changes direction and gets a little “lost” and momentarily distracted by the barking dog. No biggie. She starts working the pole hide. Then it looks to me like she starts checking pee-mail. With that distraction as well as the dog barking it seems the odor is drifting over her head and she doesn’t quite figure that out yet. (Your distance from her looks good here.)

      Prim chooses to head back in the other direction, following the grass. However, you stop her at (1:45) from going to the column and direct her back, blocking her a bit. Good girl Prim, she cuts behind you (1:47) towards the building. Here your distance from her is ok, I think I’d have had you step back a couple of steps. Now here again you restrict her and insist she works the corner hide (2:06). It’s hard to see whether she was going back to hide #1? Remember, sometimes dogs need to do that to (a) be assured they’re doing the right thing and/or (b) determine it’s a different hide they’re working. In this case your body cues look like you’re pointing to the corner of the building, whether you meant to or not. So Prim obediently keeps searching the corner. Again, a little restriction (at about 2:20, maybe necessary in this case since she was working the problem and looks to have gotten distracted maybe?) and she works nicely to the hide on the corner. 🙂

      I think you do a great job of getting Prim back to search mode after she gets a little distracted (2:46) and this time she works to the pole hide. Yeah! 🙂

      SO…

      This is a long-winded way of saying keep up your support of Prim, it’s working and it’s lovely! Be careful of being too close and crowding her. Allow Prim to range out a bit further. As long as she’s working, give her that freedom to make decisions rather than directing her. In a trial you may not have that same luxury but give her the opportunity to gain those skills so you don’t have to “manage” the search so much.

      I hope this is helpful! I’m so happy with the progress Prim is making!

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6647
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Hello Kim,

      Thanks for your thoughtful response; it is most helpful. You have a keen eye and I truly appreciate your honest assessment. When I watch the video, I have a very similar response: basically, I need to let Prim drive. I am in the way, hogging her space. She needs to make the decisions as she’s the one with the nose, hence the name of the sport, yes? 🙂

      When I lack patience, I tend to crowd. This “high hides” was the best of 3 attempts we filmed at different locations in this very large parking lot, and my frustration level was high–in my mind, Prim was not air scenting, but mostly tracking my husband who set the hides. He walked back and forth and all around when I saw him setting them, and much to my chagrin, that was what Prim was doing as well when she searched that area. She was following a similar pattern to what he did. Hence the lack of finesse on my part. [Yoga breath.]

      You are also correct when you state that you wondered if I was following the pavers for fear of tripping. I had a major right shoulder surgery a few years back, and while in the sling and recovering, I did fall very hard on that side. Whether conscious or not, I probably am fearful of falling even now. I need to be aware of my space and how it is impacting my dog. I think standing up straighter will also assist with this–I tend to lean my carriage to one side.

      Truth be told, I knew Prim was a scent hound from the moment she “sniffed” off the plane and I met her (we adopted her sight unseen from Best Friends Animal Society in Kanab, Utah, and we had her shipped to AK). Although I’ve had canine companions throughout my life and have trained them in various venues, she is my first nose worker. I need to up my game because she’s a waaaay cool dog that needs a trusting and patient team partner. I want to work hard to be that person 🙂

    • #6649

      And you’re doing a great job! 🙂 I’m just here to help you to be even better. 😉

      I can see now that Prim was probably tracking instead of crittering but she was also likely multi-tasking. She is a way cool dog! And you can watch how her mind thinks, despite the insecurities of her environment, she does focus on the searching task even thru some of those distractions.

      There are times to step into the dog and times to step back. We often work close to the dogs on vehicles to “help” them detail closely and not chase odor off into space. Once a dog understands how to work a vehicle we can usually let the dog search more freely because they will naturally take charge and work in a way that they do best. In an exterior, however, unless you really want the dog to detail a specific area, you are better off standing back and letting the dog discover how to work back to the odor. If you don’t think your dog has the skills you can begin with a more simple search but it’s important to let them figure it out.

      I’m a big believer in giving the dogs the opportunities and allowing them the freedom to make their own decisions so they can discover how to lead the way and how they can control a search.

      It’s all good! I love watching your teamwork. 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6651
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Thanks, Kim, for your generous comments. I, too, believe that dogs need opportunities that allow them freedom to think and grow. Now I need to put that theory into practice (and not have a dichotomy and helicopter handle when things aren’t going as smoothly as I’d like). 🙂

      Your concise explanation (vehicles, exteriors in the 3rd paragraph above) really resonates with me–most helpful information. Thanks!

      Part D (Varied): This is on the same day as the above parking lot videos above, but much later in the afternoon on our deck. It is relatively quiet and distraction-free. It has rained, so there is some water on the deck that has yet to evaporate. I elect to have Prim off leash so that I can stay out of her way and let her do her scent thing. Also, I am using a high-value treat, homemade meatloaf, and I want her to be precise with her alerts—sometimes she gets over-excited with this treat and alerts before she’s actually at source.

      Note: when this was originally recorded, the video for some reason was at regular speed for the beginning and end, but in slow motion for the middle. While I was not too happy about this at first, I found it to be really valuable footage. I had seen other dogs lick their lips when in odor, but I had never witnessed Prim doing so when I handle her. In fact, I didn’t recall this until I saw this slow-mo portion where she clearly does so—it is fast, but it is there. Rest assured, I edited the video to regular speed for its entirety to better suit the class and audience (It is 2:02 in real speed, but 5:40 in slow-mo).

      There are 4 hides (2 low, 1 medium, and 1 high). The first (medium) she finds at 10 seconds, yet I wait for a clear alert before rewarding.

      I can tell she’s happy because that nub is wagging. After finding the low hide on the broom (35 sec), she moves to the raised flower bed and checks the grill and the foliage. She then comes back to the table, going around it into the garden. I’m hearing her breathing change at this point and her head raises up; I believe she will work this scent cone to source, up the steps to a flower pot (low hide), which she does at around 1:22.

      The next hide is the high one and it is on a white wrought iron wall hanging above the Adirondack chairs. Immediately, and without lingering, she works with determination, exiting down the step into the garden and backing up onto the deck. Working back to the Adirondacks, she searches high, medium, and low. I am pleased. She zeroes in and tah-dah!

    • #6654

      That was excellent! 🙂

      I don’t have anything to comment other than she’s searching very well! Now to take that on the road… 😉

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6657
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Thanks, Kim. This was a great search for Prim as it really shows how much she has learned and grown 🙂

    • #6658
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      “Keeping Up”: This wall series was completed at a local elementary school yesterday. We’ve gotten a lot of rain lately, and this was a lull from the storm so to speak. It was cloudy, cool (50 degrees), and breezy.

      *Inside Corner: The video wasn’t recording when we initially began (about 3 seconds prior), so we re-started as Prim was already working on the case.

    • #6670

      Fantastic! She is DRIVEN to find the odor, even in a new environment!! Yeah! 😀

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6672
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Outside Corner: Due to the wind, I wanted to give Prim a longer “entrance” as we entered the search area so that she could drive. She chooses correctly to turn the corner, and detects odor pooling in the spout beneath the outside corner hide. Next, she searches the window and I try to stay out of her way as she solves this problem.

    • #6673

      Great job!

      You’re getting the hang of it. 😉 I would have had you round the corner earlier, as Prim headed towards the windows, somewhere around (:16). Your position is indicating you want her to work the other side of the wall but good girl, she kept heading the direction she was going and you did round the corner at approx. (:24) and then stepped back to relieve the body pressure (:27). Prim then finds the hide (:32).

      It’s subtle, but if you look at your position and movement (or non-movement) you can see how it could influence Prim. What a good girl! 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6674
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      I agree. My hesitation is evident and after viewing the video, I do see how my body position could influence Prim. Thank goodness she is ignoring me for the most part 🙂

      Middle: Prim veers left and briefly searches an outside corner and an inside corner before working down to the middle of the wall.

      Again, my body language is impacting our teamwork, particularly in the corner areas. At the time, I wanted to give her leash, but it appears that I’m trying to leash lead instead, as I move in the direction I want her to go.

    • #6675

      Yes! These exercises are a great learning tool for you to see how it’s so easy to do that! 🙂

      BTW, I love your enthusiastic celebration at the finds! 😀

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6676
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Indeed! The video is showing what I need to see 🙂 And yes, I find Prim performs better when I’m enthusiastic. I generally don’t like to exhibit “dance in the end zone” behavior, but it works for Prim, so I’m happy to do so.

      Poles: these were also completed at the elementary school in the same time as the above wall series.

      Stand alone: this hide is on the flagpole (school-side vs. parking lot side). Also, it was the very first search area we taped at the school in the series of walls and poles and you can tell that this “high hide” game is new to her. She’s not as confident, yet I’m still pleased she’s working so hard.

      We start down from the search area due to the wind—I want her to work up to the pole. She uses the trees, concrete seating, and the foliage to follow the odor. It’s evident from her repeated head and nose position that she knows the hide is up. I wait until she is a bit closer to the “correct” location before rewarding. (She keeps making passes at the pole at 19 secs, 31 secs, 37 secs. However, in my mind, she gives the most confident alert at 56 seconds.)

      To avoid my tendency for helicopter handling, I wanted to give Prim distance with the leash, but it felt like that got in the way near the end of the search. It was dragging on the ground, tangling my nose worker, and getting in the way of her searching the pole. Your thoughts?

    • #6682

      I think you did a great job of staying out of her way. Sure, it could have been smoother but the bottom line is the tangles didn’t even seem to deter Prim and she kept working. You were not as influential with this search and it wasn’t needed in this case. Reserve the body pressure for when you feel it is necessary.

      I think you were smart to reward when you did and I liked seeing Prim figuring out the problem, even if it meant going around the pole a few times! The only suggestion I would make is after you paid her for finding the hide you could have done a couple of different things;

      (a) Held a reward up at the hide and asked Prim to go UP to get the reward again or
      (b) WAITED (w/o a cue) for Prim to get more insistent of the location of the hide location and re-pay

      You have to decide if she would be hesitant to go up w/o prompting (some dogs won’t put their feet on something like a pole). You could do (a), then meld into (b) so she gets multiple rewards for something she might find difficult. This reinforces her driving to source, even if she can’t put her nose on the actual hide. Or choose something that helps with that reinforcement. 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6687
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Thanks for the feedback. I think either option would have been good. She physically can go UP and if she wasn’t willing to do so, she does have a stronger cue. I will keep those tips in mind for the future.

      Pillar: This column only has 3 sides (rather than the 4 access sides you requested). However, I am posting it as it shows Prim doing a nice job working the adjacent elevated area to zero in on the hide’s location, using the trees and foliage on the incline and purposely crossing the sidewalk over to the “real” search area. Note how she gets distracted by neighborhood sounds (27-34 seconds). I elect to wait her out initially, but opt to re-cue her. Surprisingly to me, she seamlessly picks up the search where she has left off and alerts.

    • #6695

      Wonderful! 🙂

      I think it was good to give Prim the opportunity to part from the distraction and when she didn’t, to give her a slight re-cue.

      She did look like she was working the adjacent ground area as she began the search and it all looked really good!

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6703
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Thanks. I was happy with the search overall–initially, I thought she might be on a walk about, but I was able to hear her breathing and it is different when she is searching actively vs. when she is crittering. Also, this search didn’t turn out the way I imagined in a good way. Prim has had difficulty getting back on task in the past when distracted. I’m thrilled that the slight re-cue actually worked! 🙂

      Object: This hide is located in a clock sculpture near the front entrance of the school. Prim begins with much enthusiasm and does a nice job working the side of the building and the main entrance. I consciously am trying to give her space and let her make the decisions—truthfully, I am much more successful at doing this at the beginning of the video rather than at its end. Too much leash as she is circling this pole-like object also proves to be a challenge. When she alerts on the opposite side of where the hide is, I hesitate to reward. [Sigh.] With her still working, I elect to let her get a bit closer before ending this search. I knew then as well as now watching this video that I assist way too much as she gets closer to source.

    • #6707

      Great observations! This is what is nice about video review, we can see where we help/hinder and what we might need to work on. Yes, Prim would be correct anywhere on the pole. 🙂 It does seem that she knew it was the pole and on the “correct” side maybe even spotted the tube. She is a sight hound, after all. 😉

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6714
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      That she is. She reminds me of this frequently 🙂

      [When we are nose working, I tend to think I have the bluetick scent hound by my side. However, she has been a great lesson for me with the scent and sight hound lineage. It is an amazing combo and I have to get up very early to pull one past her :)]

    • #6717
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Interiors: it was about 78 degrees today, which is considered very, very warm by Alaskan standards, especially since AC is not something that is popular here in public spaces or in most homes. The fire danger is high due to the temperature, the low humidity, and the breezy winds. The reason I mention this is that we did have the house windows open wide, but had to close them as a nearby house was barbecuing and the Kingsford briquet smell was wafting in; it was quite overwhelming for me. Thankfully, Prim seemed unfazed.

      I am including both the A and B parts of the exercise (which together are under the 3 minute mark), since they would be run back to back in a trial–these two rooms are adjacent to each other with just a hall separating them.

      Interior searches (Part A): this first of this two part exercise was in the guest bedroom. Unbeknownst to me, there are two hides. Prim quickly finds the first hide under the far side of the bed. She does a nice job of working the entire room, searching thoroughly. I initially thought that there might be a convergence when she almost alerts on the opposite side of the bed. However, after a few rotations of the wall, ski poles, and the wicker chest, she returns to hide #1 where I assumed that the odor was just traveling from one side of the bed to the other.

      I was wrong. Team Primula missed the high hide on the skis which are hanging on the wall, across and up from Hide #1. After watching the video, I can tell that Prim does believe something is there, yet she isn’t quite ready to commit. Handler error: I needed to give her time to let her work through the problem.

      Interior search (Part B): this is in the guest bathroom. Prim has had difficulty in the past with very small rooms and remaining focused, so this was a great challenge for us. After Prim works the entire space and finally exits, I call finish to indicate the room is clear. (I do this and say 40 seconds and it was 50–my videographer accidentally clicked the camera off where you would hear this. My apologies.) Yay: we are correct and it was clear 🙂

    • #6720

      Interesting comparing the two searches. In the clear room, Prim’s tail barely moves. This could be that she’s not as secure or it could be because there is no odor = no party/reward at the end. It would be worth experimenting by doing another videotaped search WITH odor in that very room to see if her tail movement changes.

      In the first search, you have a challenging hide on the wall. She definitely shows signs of detecting something higher in the room. All of the investigations up, on elevated surfaces says there might be something up. Against the wall like that can be hard since there isn’t a lot of ways for the dog to triangulate it. By going slightly outside the door, she could use the edge of the wall (:44) but she just doesn’t have enough time (or experience) to work out this problem. More exposure to this type of hide and it should become easier. 🙂

      Overall she’s looking good!

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6731
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      You are correct on Prim’s tail not moving in the clear room. If time allows (with the class ending Sunday), I will videotape a search with a hide in there to compare/contrast.

      Can you Hear Me Now: Containers. This is on the same day as the above; the search area is a very warm and loud (around seconds 24-34 as the video will demonstrate) garage. We opted to not open the garage door as there was not only the briquette smell, but also quite a few hornets buzzing around outside and Prim has been known to eat flying insects.

      The video begins about 5 seconds after we start. Prim is very much a peripheral searcher and checks the surrounding area as she narrows in and commits to alerts: the first is on the small brown box and the second is in the plastic watering can. Her last alert which I call—and I’ve watched the video several times and it looks like a definitive alert to me—was an empty black bag. (Boo-hoo!) No odor was near it and it hasn’t ever been used for distractors or hides.

      Quick question: This was a blind search and I did reward for a false alert. Am I reinforcing something I shouldn’t be?

      [Time: I guess 1:40 and it was 1:26.]

    • #6737

      First question is why your helper didn’t tell you “no” – ?

      No, you should not reward the false alert. You didn’t break your dog but I’d be really careful about that. Make sure your helper knows that they need to confirm yes or no.

      What could have happened is some odor was pooling at the drain and somehow drifted over to the adjacent bag. Could have been when Prim walked by, could have been when you walked by, a random air current or – ? So hard to know but with a hot air temperature and cooler ground temp at the drain it can do funny things. OR, Prim was responding to some cue from you when she was showing interest in the bag, just because.

      If you’ll watch the video she doesn’t respond to that bag as if it were odor the first time she searches it. In contrast, she *does* respond to odor for the other two containers the very first time she checks them. She paws the box, she backs off the watering “can” in order to get payment. With this bag, she showed mild interest the first time but moved on. The second time she was trying to get inside the bag, not asking for payment. Take a look at (1:05). Seeing her interest, you started to step in to pay. And then she looks at you.

      SO – what does this mean? Nothing too bad, really. I think it’s time to purposely delay the reward SLIGHTLY to elicit some sort of alert behavior rather than call it on a paw or nuzzling a container. Wait for some kind of “look” if she’ll give that to you, even if it’s just a sideways glance, “why aren’t you paying me?” AND, watch yourself so that you aren’t inadvertently cuing her. You could argue that you got behavior with this but it seemed to me more like general interest rather than an indication of odor. It can be subtle.

      This is the kind of exercise that will reveal these things. Often there is something in the reward process so you want to know if it’s something you’re doing that Prim is responding to.

      What are your thoughts?

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6738
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Thanks for the clarification. Prim is fairly odor obedient and doesn’t false alert consistently. I should have asked ahead of time if my helper could say “no.” No other classmate videos were yet posted with this issue, so I failed to ask as I just didn’t anticipate this being an issue. My bad.

      Where I was at during the taping: in the video, there is a black worm farm (I’m an avid gardner). On the first rotation, Prim shows interest in this on the peripheral (second 10). On the second go around, she seemed to linger and I suspect that you are right: I thought worm farm and scent cone. Boom. And big miss and sink. I need to leave my baggage at the airport, yes 🙂

      Overall, I do think that this exercise would have been more successful with the garage door open–it was hot and it was still in the search. Yes, there would have been a breeze. But yes, this could have been a more useful scenario.

      I like your idea about “the look.” I will try to get this before rewarding…sounds like a plan. Stay tuned.

      Again, I appreciate your keen observation and honest assessment. Many thanks!

    • #6743

      Well, I can only give you feedback on what I observe. Sometimes I don’t know all the “other” stuff going on, so you have to extrapolate what I say and try to make sense of it in your real world. 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6749
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Can You Hear Me Now: Vehicles. This blind search was taped this morning in our driveway. It is 50 degrees, cloudy, and very breezy—the loud background sound is the wind as well as the neighbor’s wind chime and later, an airplane. We are using our Saturn Vues, along with a workbench for the third vehicle.

      We are in a narrow area and around second 28, I talk too much and tell Prim I can back up (to give her space). I’m wondering now if I pulled her off odor—I find out after this search that we do miss a hide on the muffler of the blue Vue.

      As you can see, Prim is lackluster and even tentative. I’m thinking she’s not liking the wind or at least, it is making this search more challenging. She takes her time finding the first hide in the wheel of the black Vue (1:05-1:28), working backward to the odor and being sure she is correct.

      The second hide is on the tool box and she does a nice job using the blue Vue wheel to narrow on in (1:54-2:22).

      From 2:40-2:50, Prim is back in the foliage and just stops, distracted. I call finish.

      Summary: there were 3 total hides; we missed the one on the muffler.

      What do you see?

      [Time: I thought 2:30 and it was 2:50-ish.]

    • #6753

      This search is a good example of how and environmental situation can influence the HANDLER and how one works a search. You likely did call Prim off of odor. When she goes back to that general area, she SKIPS the back of the blue Vue in favor of working the black Vue plus a bit of distraction. She never gets back to the blue Vue except to work the toolbox hide – which was super, btw!

      This is a Handler issue where you need to ensure that your dog investigates the vehicles completely. Not sure which tail pipe* area the hide is located (driver’s side/passenger’s side) but she definitely showed interest in the beginning and it would be worth taking her back to approach from the opposite direction.

      *FWIW, we don’t generally use tailpipes for hides since they can be hot with a vehicle that is freshly driven. If we make this a productive location, the dogs may investigate in the future and could be burned.

      I think Prim does look a bit hesitant in this search, which makes it additionally important for you to step in and take a bit more control. Not to sell her but to ensure she is thorough. Make sense?

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6756
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Yes, this makes sense. The hide we missed was in the center of the back of the blue Vue. I agree: I needed to take her back to that area in the opposite direction as she did show interest twice. I also need to take control when Prim is hesitant.

      I’ve been struggling with this issue–balance between letting Prim drive and yet being supportive and taking more control when it is neeeded–this is something I still need to master. For most of this class, I’ve been too heavy-handed….

      —-

      Can You Hear Me Now: Exteriors. We tried three different exterior searches away from the house; however, Prim was just not into working and easily distracted. Due to time constraints, we taped this one on our large deck yesterday (same day as vehicle search). It chronologically is later, but the wind is still gusty, and seems to be blowing from the door side of the deck to the garden side of the deck (screen left to right).

      I am pleased Prim has more zip in her step as we begin. She looks like she’s ready to go. Around 11 seconds, she correctly alerts on a low hide near a deck stair.

      Continuing, she thoroughly searches, and even checks under the deck (sec 37-47), before circling the table a few times along with checking the rose bushes. I like that near the door, she does look high. Because her tail is wagging and I can see her licking her lips, I elect to wait her out to see if there’s another hide.

      Summary: only one hide. Did I wait too long to call this one? Could that low hide be pooling diagonally across where she was checking under the deck?

      Time: My guess 2:00 and real time is 2:15.

    • #6757

      Working thru pooling odor can be one of the hardest things about an Exterior search! One of the biggest clues that it is pooling and not source is how the dog tries to narrow down the location. Prim is all over the place, investigating very thoroughly, trying to find the odor AND she goes back to the one she already found. That’s a really good clue that there are no more hides. She goes back at about a minute to check herself but because you want her to, she continues to hunt harder yet never gives any indication of source elsewhere. You could have called “Finish” around the 1 minute mark. However, this takes time to establish a comfort level that Prim WILL show changes of behavior and TELL you if there is anything else.

      FWIW, as for being “heavy-handed” with Prim in her searching, I’ve not seen ANYthing like that. You’ve been very balanced with Prim IMO, and she’s responded in kind. 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

    • #6758
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Your explanation on pooling odor and not source (with how the dog narrows down the location) is really helpful. I do see this pattern as you describe above as well as her return to the first hide at the minute mark. I agree about the comfort level being one of trust. As a team, Prim and I need more practice and experience to build confidence and arrive at this level of consistent communication 🙂

    • #6759
      Stefanie Alexander
      Participant

      Only if time allows:

      Redo: Interior (Guest Bathroom with Odor). We are comparing and contrasting to the “clear” small room above. Honestly, I don’t see much tail activity and I’m wondering if I have a dog that just likes more space. What do you see?

    • #6760

      I would agree with you! She is clearly not comfortable searching in this small space and there was no nubby tail wag. However, with odor being present she seemed to be detailing the space a bit more and *did* go deep to locate the hide. 🙂

      Kimberly Buchanan
      Joyride K9 Dog Training

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