~JOYRIDE K9 *REMOTE* K9NW EDUCATION~

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    • #3070
      Kathryn Dobyns
      Participant

        I am home from PA Nosework Camp, which was an amazing experience. I went as a camp “helper” (otherwise known as crate hauler/driver/all-around gofer) and I left Hunter at the kennel. I had the chance to watch lots of dogs at different skill levels and many instructors from all over the country. I even got to see some video of Kim working her dog in Amy & Jill’s lectures on the extra “Symposium” day! I learned so much – if you get a chance to go to a camp, do it. I was advised to go without a dog the first time, and I think that was great advice. I don’t think camp would be a good fit for Hunter, but it was awesome for me.

      • #3071
        Tina Evrard
        Participant

          A couple of my friends went and listening to their daily recaps made me want to go too! Thank you for sharing your perspective, now I will seriously consider it for next year.

        • #3072
          Kimberly Buchanan
          Keymaster

            Thanks for the feedback, Kathryn! Which videos did you get to see of us?? (I never know which ones they show so it always tickles me when people say they saw us!) ๐Ÿ™‚

            Kimberly Buchanan
            Joyride K9 Dog Training

          • #3074
            Kathryn Dobyns
            Participant

              Kim, the one I remember most vividly was a still photo of you and Emmy at the start line – Amy was taking about equipment choices – Emmy is leaning into her harness and I think may have 1 back foot on the ground as she gets ready to blast into the search area!

            • #3113
              Kimberly Buchanan
              Keymaster

                Ah yes, I know that photo! One of my favorites! ๐Ÿ™‚

                I think Jill is using one of Zen finding odor dropping from a balcony above him? Fun stuff! ๐Ÿ™‚

                Kimberly Buchanan
                Joyride K9 Dog Training

              • #3386
                Deb (De) Frost
                Participant

                  Kathryn,
                  I was hoping you’d share more information about your experience at NW Camp. My goal is to attend one – hopefully next year, but I really don’t know what goes on. I’d LIKE to take Baxter with me and attend with a “working spot”, but don’t know if that will be practical, if the dogs need to be a specific type or temperament, whether they stay with the people most of the time or in a kennel somewhere on the property …. Bax is kennel trained and fine to be left in his crate for a couple of hours at a time, but he’d probably not be happen kenneled with a bunch of other dogs.

                  And do you think auditing is a better “learning environment” than bringing a dog and taking a working spot? What sort of things do students DO on an average day at camp? What do they do in the evenings? How long of a day (activity-wise) is it, and how much of that time is spent with the dogs?

                  Stuff like that! ๐Ÿ™‚

                • #3392
                  Kimberly Buchanan
                  Keymaster

                    I’ll let Kathryn answer this since the question was posed to her. I’ve taught at (4?) PA camps, (2) GA camps, (1) CO camp and (1) OR camp. I love teaching at camp! Am happy to answer any questions, as well. ๐Ÿ™‚

                    Kimberly Buchanan
                    Joyride K9 Dog Training

                  • #3414
                    Kathryn Dobyns
                    Participant

                      Okay, more on nosework camp! First off, I went as a camp helper, which meant I had the flexibility of an auditor when not moving crates around (and I paid less – full price would have been a stretch for me). I highly recommend going without a dog if you are a helper – those helpers who brought dogs were really stressed trying to keep up with work, dog care and the special working sessions designed for the helpers.

                      I went to camp for me, not my dog. People in my area want me to teach, so I made a point of attending s wide variety of sessions – many for the less experienced dogs, so I could learn how to teach the handlers. The instructors were all very accommodating and would answer questions and offer interpretation of a problem in the time between working dogs. For me, it was so helpful to just see a variety of dogs of different types (and one toy-reward dog!) working problems while listening to the instructor’s commentary.

                      I know that Hunter would not have been comfortable in the camp environment for that many days in a row. He does not love lots of other dogs and would have been on edge the whole time. My deceased Husky-Hound, who was entirely appropriate with other dogs and loved all people would have been a perfect camp dog. You need to know your dog – the PA camp was pretty spread out, but there were still more than 100 dogs there for 4 days!

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